SLOOH Space Camera to Broadcast Super Close Moon/Jupiter Pairing


On Monday, January 21st, the Moon will appear amazingly close in the sky to the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. The waxing gibbous Moon -- the lunar phase between first-quarter Moon and full Moon -- will be approximately one degree south of Jupiter appearing to be only a pen width apart. This will be closest conjunction between the two celestial bodies until 2026. Slooh Space Camera will cover the event live on Slooh.com, free to the public, Monday, January 21st, at 6:00 p.m. PST / 9:00 p.m. EST / 02:00 UTC (1/22) -- international times at http://goo.gl/xySeo -- accompanied by real-time discussions with Slooh president Patrick Paolucci, Astronomy magazine columnist Bob Berman, and astro-imager Matt Francis of the Prescott Observatory. Viewers can watch live on their PC or iOS/Android mobile device at t-minus zero.

By good fortune, the Great Red Spot will be traveling across the middle of Jupiter's disk during Slooh's live broadcast.

If skies are clear, individuals can view the conjunction by looking at the Moon and finding the brightest "star" in the sky next to the Moon, which will be Jupiter. Individuals with binoculars or a telescope may capture more detail of Jupiter, including some of the satellites.

Contact:
Patrick Paolucci
+1 877-427-5664 x707
press@slooh.com

News Media: To embed the live broadcast into your online coverage (media only), please contact Patrick Paolucci to receive embed code 30 minutes prior to broadcast.

Slooh Space Camera G+ Page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/108176209664415419112/

Slooh is the leader in live, celestial event programming with weekly shows featuring the great wonders of the universe -- shown live by observatories worldwide. Slooh is powered by its members -- men, women and children in 80 countries who have taken 1.8 million photos of 46,000 unique objects and events in the night sky since our launch on Christmas Day, 2003. Slooh's patented instant imaging technology makes astronomical objects appear in true color and in real time over a 5 to 10 minute time frame.

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