NASA ESAS Final Report November 2005: Section 13.0 Summary and Recommendations


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Editor's note: DOWNLOAD THIS SECTION (PDF)

Editor's note: several days ago we posted a final (October 2005) draft of this report. We have since come across a complete copy of the final version of the report (November 2005) which has recently been approved by NASA Administrator Michael Griffin. In order to present the most accurate version of this report, we have removed the draft version and replaced it with the final version of the report. NASA is expected to publicly release this report in early January 2006.

13. Summary and Recommendations

The lunar architecture defined by the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) integrates mission mode analysis, flight element functionality, and the activities to be performed on the lunar surface. An integrated analysis of mission performance, safety, reliability, and cost led to the selection of a preferred mission mode, the definition of functional and performance requirements for the vehicle set, and the definition of lunar surface operations. Additionally, the analysis looked back to examine how the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) would be used to transport crew and cargo to the International Space Station (ISS), and looked forward to define the systems that will carry explorers to Mars and beyond, in order to identify evolutionary functional, technological, and operational threads that bind these destinations together.

13.2 CEV Recommendations

One of the key requirements to enable a successful human space exploration program is the development and implementation of a vehicle capable of transporting and housing crew on LEO, lunar, and Mars missions. A major portion of the ESAS effort focused on the design and development of the CEV, the means by which NASA plans to accomplish these mission objectives. This section provides a summary of the findings and recommendations specific to the CEV.


Table of Contents

This large 50 MB PDF report has been subdivided into 17 PDF files - one for each of the report's 17 sections. Click on the link at the top of each section to visit a summary page and to download that section.

Editor's note: several days ago we posted a final (October 2005) draft of this report. We have since come across a complete copy of the final version of the report (November 2005) which has recently been approved by NASA Administrator Michael Griffin. In order to present the most accurate version of this report, we have removed the draft version and replaced it with the final version of the report. NASA is expected to publicly release this report in early January 2006.

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