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NASA ISS On-Orbit Status 15 October 2010

Status Report From: NASA HQ
Posted: Friday, October 15, 2010

image All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

At wake-up, FE-2 Skripochka conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [FE-2 again inspects the filters before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

After wakeup, CDR Wheelock, FE-6 Walker & FE-3 Kelly performed another session of the Reaction Self Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self Test on the ISS) protocol, first time for Scott. [The RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

Wheelock, Kelly & Walker continued their current week-long activity with the post-wakeup experiment SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight), 6th for Wheels & Shannon, 1st for Scott, transferring data from their Actiwatches to the HRF-1 (Human Research Facility 1) laptop. [To monitor their sleep/wake patterns and light exposure during a SLEEP session, crewmembers wear a special Actiwatch device which measures the light levels encountered by him/her as well as their patterns of sleep and activity throughout the Expedition, using the payload software for data logging and filling in questionnaire entries in the experiment's laptop session file on the HRF-1 laptop. The log entries are done within 15 minutes of final awakening for seven consecutive days.]

Also at day's begin, FE1 Kaleri terminated his first experiment session, started last night, for the long-term Russian sleep study MBI-12/Sonokard, taking the recording device from his Sonokard sports shirt pocket and later copying the measurements to the RSE-Med laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember's physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

Before breakfast & exercise, Alex, Oleg & Fyodor each completed a 10-min session with the periodic Russian MedOps test "Hematokrit" (MO-10), which measures the red cell count of the blood, with one of them acting as CMO (Crew Medical Officer, Russian: "Examiner"). It was the first session for FE-1 & FE-2, the 2nd for FE-5. [The blood samples were drawn from a finger with a perforator lancet, then centrifuged in two microcapillary tubes in the M-1100 kit's minicentrifuge, and its hematocrit value was read off the tubes with a magnifying glass. It is a well-known phenomenon of space flight that red blood cell count (normal range: 30-45%) tends to go down over time. After the exam, the data were saved in the IFEP software (In-Flight Examination Program) on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer).]

For measuring CO2 concentrations around him while at work, CDR Wheelock set up a CDM (Carbon Dioxide Monitor, #1020) close to his breathing zone throughout his workday, to be downloaded and stowed before sleeptime. [The CDM, which required a fresh battery, was attached to a Nomex belt and worn around his torso. Station time (GMT) and CDM clock were to be called down to MCC-H for correlation with the data downloaded from the CDM.]

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Doug Wheelock supported EMCS (European Modular Cultivation System) research by switching on EMCS for ground-commanded power-up from POIC (Payload Operations & Integration Center/Huntsville).

Doug Wheelock then took the new crewmembers Kelly, Skripochka & Kaleri through the 2h 15m Emergency Egress Equipment Readiness drill (Trenirovka po avarijnomu pokidaniyu MKS), OBT (onboard training) for the case of rapid cabin depressurization, with Russian & US specialists standing by at both control centers for crew questions or comments, followed by a crew debrief with ground specialists. [Background: Purpose of the drill is to (a) familiarize the station residents with the location of hardware and the positions of valves used in emergency situations, (b) perform a survey of each hatch for drag-through cables (and reporting results to TsUP, (c) work through the RS (Russian Segment) hardware deactivation procedures, (c) practice crew emergency joint activities, and (d) identify crew comments and suggestions that arise during training regarding crew procedures and equipment. In the RS, the crew usually translates along the emergency egress paths, currently to the MRM1 & MRM2 (where Soyuz 23S & 24S, resp. are docked), checking hardware such as the Sokol suits, cable cutters, fire extinguisher (OKR), gas masks (IPK), emergency procedures books, valve settings, hatch rubber seal & restraint integrity, etc. In the US Segment (USOS) the inspection usually focuses on readiness of CSA-CP (Compound Specific Analyzer-Combustion Products), ISS leak kit, PBA (portable breathing assembly) and PFE (portable fire extinguisher), emergency procedures books, valve settings, integrity of hatch rubber seals, presence of hatch handrails, etc. The checks include PMA-1, Node-1, Airlock, Node-3, Node-2, COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), JLP (Japanese Experiment Module Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section) and Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module). During the session, the crew simulated executing the planned emergency procedures while moving about the station. For the case of an onboard fire and for emergency descent, there are other mandatory emergency drill OBTs.]

Yurchikhin performed periodic service of the RS (Russian Segment) radiation payload suite "Matryoshka-R" (RBO-3-2), reading the recorded radiation traces of eight Bubble dosimeters, then initializing & re-deploying the detectors and verifying proper function of the setup with the LULIN-5 electronics box. [A total of eight Bubble dosimeter detectors (A21-A28) were initialized in the Bubble dosimeter reader in the SM (Service Module) and positioned at new exposure locations, all in the starboard crew quarters. The deployment locations of the detectors were photo-documented with the NIKON D2X camera and also reported with initialization data to TsUP via log sheet via OCA. The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Note: Matryoshka is the name for the traditional Russian set of nested dolls.]

Doug Wheelock took the monthly O-OHA (On-Orbit Hearing Assessment) test, a 30-min NASA environmental health systems examination to assess the efficacy of acoustic countermeasures, using a special software application on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) laptop. [The O-OHA audiography test involves minimum audibility measurements for each ear over a wide range of frequencies (0.25-10 kHz) and sound pressure levels, with the crewmembers using individual-specific Prophonics earphones, new Bose ANC headsets (delivered on 30P) and the SLM (sound level meter). To conduct the testing, the experimenter is supported by special EarQ software on the MEC, featuring an up/down-arrow-operated slider for each test frequency that the crewmember moves to the lowest sound pressure level at which the tone can still be heard. The baseline test is required not later than about Flight Day 14 for each new Expedition and is then generally performed once per month. Note: There has been temporary hearing deficits documented on some U.S. and Russian crewmembers, all of which recovered to pre-mission levels.]

Walker performed a 300mL purge and took 1L sample from the PWD (Portable Water Dispenser) auxiliary port for return on ULF5.

In the Cupola in Node-3, Shannon deployed a second wireless SSC (Station Support Computer, SSC-19) laptop to support for ULF5 robotics video operations.

Oleg, like Alex on 10/12, ran a familiarization test of the Russian Russia's EKON Environmental Safety Agency, making observations and taking KPT-3 aerial photography of environmental conditions on Earth using the NIKON D3X camera with the RSK-1 laptop.

Fyodor started (later terminated) copying measurement data from the external EXPOSE-R experiment from the BSMM Multiplex Bus Synchronization Unit/computer to the RSS1 laptop (deleting the data on the BSMM). [The European EXPOSE-R experiment, containing plant seeds and spores of bacteria & fungi, was mounted outside the SM (Service Module) during the Russian EVA-21A on 3/11/09 after some earlier problems.]

Doug & Shannon filled out their weekly FFQs (Food Frequency Questionnaires) on the MEC. [On the FFQs, NASA astronauts keep a personalized log of their nutritional intake over time on special MEC software. Recorded are the amounts consumed during the past week of such food items as beverages, cereals, grains, eggs, breads, snacks, sweets, fruit, beans, soup, vegetables, dairy, fish, meat, chicken, sauces & spreads, and vitamins. The FFQ is performed once a week to estimate nutrient intake from the previous week and to give recommendations to ground specialists that help maintain optimal crew health. Weekly estimation has been verified to be reliable enough that nutrients do not need to be tracked daily.]

Other activities completed by Wheels included -

* Supporting the JAXA 2DNT (2D Nano Template) experiment by retrieving two 2DNT Ziploc bags from MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS), photographing the sample bags and inserting them into the MELFI (set at +2 degC),

* Continuing gathering and readying EVA (Extravehicular Activity) tools & equipment for the ULF5 spacewalks, and

* Taking turns with Walker to discharge/recharge Makita batteries for EVA PGT (Pistol Grip Tools) [each Makita discharge takes ~25 min, followed by a cool down period of 1h minimum and recharge, which takes 1h25m.]

Other tasks performed by Shannon Walker were -

* Supporting payload ground controllers by powering up, then (4h45m later) turning off the SpaceDRUMS/SDRM (Space Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix System) payload,

* Using a VCAM (Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor) remote sampling bag to obtain an air sample from a location away from the VCAM, and then letting VCAM analyze the specimen,

* Collecting US trash and discarded equipment for transferring to Progress M-05M/37P, to be undocked on 10/26,

* Deactivating ALTEA (Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts) Shield dosimetry data collection, relocating the Shield Isotropic Equipment (from Lab loc. S2 to O5), reactivating data collection and taking documentary photography [ALTEA-Shield uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the US Lab in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous Light Flashes. FE-6 today set up the ALTEA-Shield Survey configuration in the second of three sites (the first was utilized on 9/20.]

Shannon & Wheels undertook the regular monthly session of the CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) emergency medical operations OBT (On-Board Training) drill, each going through a 30-min. exercise to refresh their CMO (Crew Medical Officer) acuity in a number of critical health areas. The video-based proficiency drill today focused on ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support). [The HMS (Health Maintenance Systems) hardware, including ACLS equipment, may be used in contingency situations where crew life is at risk. To maintain proficiency, crewmembers spend one hour per month reviewing HMS and ACLS equipment and procedures via the HMS and ACLS CBT (computer-based training). The training drill, each crewmember for him/herself, refreshes their memory of the on-orbit stowage and deployment locations, equipment etc. and procedures.]

Wheels performed an inspection of the Sabatier AAA (Avionics Air Assembly) hose for possible leak path, to be repaired as needed. [From ground inspection of downlinked photos, it looked like there may have been a small leak path at an indentation in the hose. This activity had Doug inspect this location and add more tape if necessary.]

Working in support of the Sabatier reactor installation, Scott Kelly conducted the 2nd 4hr part of OGS (Oxygen Generator System) flow balancing, first setting the OGA TCS (Oxygen Generation Assembly Thermal Control System) internal valves to "best guess" positions, then taking initial measurements of internal flow rates using the NIFM (Non-Intrusive Flow Meter). NIFM was then safed for the time being. [Purpose of these extended valve adjustments is to optimize the TCS flow in the presence of the newly-added Sabatier system.]

Supporting the JAXA MI (Marangoni Inside) in the Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module)'s FPEF (Fluid Physics Experiment Facility), Scott switched cable connections on the SCOF (Solution Crystallization Observation Facility) set up by Wheels on 9/21, disconnecting the SCOF payload bus and IPU (Image Processing Unit) User Video cables and mating the FPEF payload bus cable and IPU User Video cables connection.

Yurchikhin & Kaleri connected the Kurs-P AFU (Antenna Feeder Unit) in DC1 to the K2-VKA antenna instrumentation unit in the SM. [KURS is the automated radar approach & docking system on the Russian Soyuz & Progress vehicles, with the active (KURS-A) component in the visiting vehicles and the passive transponder/repeater-type KURS-P component in the SM.]

Afterwards Fyodor & Alex conducted an internal test of the TORU manual teleoperated rendezvous & approach system with the docked Progress 37P spacecraft.

Oleg performed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

Skripochka & Yurchikhin had another hour to transfer discarded equipment and trash to Progress 37P for disposal.

Fyodor completed the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance by updating/editing its standard "delta file" including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Fyodor also had ~1h reserved for shooting more "Chronicle" newsreel footage using the SONY HVR-Z7 #2 high-definition camcorder as part of the ongoing effort to create a photo & video imagery database on the flight of ISS-24/25 ("Flight Chronicles"). [Footage subjects generally include conducting experiments, current activities at the station, repair activities behind panels, exercise, cosmonauts looking out the window at the Earth, Earth surface, station interior, cosmonaut in zero gravity, leisure, life on orbit, personal hygiene, meals, station exterior, comm. passes with the ground, ham radio passes, station cleaning, spacesuits, space hardware, MRM1, MRM2, DC1, FGB, Soyuz & Progress, intermodular passageways, meeting a new crew, crewmember in space, medical experiments, handover activities, crew return preparations, farewell ceremonies, etc. The photo/video imagery is saved digitally on HDDs (Hard Disk Drives) for return to Earth on Soyuz.]

Alex, Oleg & Scott again had an hour each set aside for crew onboard orientation plus time for adaptation as required. [During the first two weeks after their arrival, a new ISS crew will have 1 hour a day (or more if needed) to adjust to living in space.]

At ~4:06am EDT, the entire crew supported a Russian PAO event, downlinking greetings to the XVIII International School Space Science Contest.

At ~7:40am, Alex, Oleg & Fyodor linked up with TsUP/Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly RS IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

At ~7:55am, Shannon & Fyodor tagged up with Houston ground specialists to discuss their latest (10/13) 30-min Shuttle RPM (R-bar Pitch Maneuver) onboard skill training, where they used D2X digital still cameras with 400 & 800mm lenses to take earth images using CEO earth observation targets. [The RPM drill prepares crewmembers for the bottom-side mapping of the Orbiter at the arrival of the Shuttle (STS-133/Discovery/ULF-5) on 11/3. During the RPM at ~600 ft from the station, the "shooters" have only ~90 seconds for taking high-resolution digital photographs of all tile areas and door seals on Discovery, to be downlinked for launch debris assessment. Thus, time available for the shooting will be very limited, requiring great coordination between the two headset-equipped photographers and the Shuttle pilot.]

At ~3:40pm, the crew will hold their regular weekly tagup with the Lead Flight Director at JSC/MCC-Houston.

At ~4:20pm, Wheels is scheduled for his weekly PFC (Private Family Conference) via S-band/audio and Ku-band/MS-NetMeeting application (which displays the uplinked ground video on an SSC laptop).

The crew worked out on today's 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (FE-3), TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-1, FE-2, FE-5, FE-6), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR, FE-3, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR) and VELO ergometer bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1, FE-2, FE-5). [T2 snubber arm inspection is no longer needed after every T2 session but must be done after the last T2 session of the day.]

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) photo targets uplinked for today were Bosumtwi Impact Crater, Ghana (this impact crater is located about 150 km west of the south end of Lake Volta in south central Ghana. It is a very young impact [just over a million years old], about 10.5 km in diameter, and almost completely filled by a lake. There are very few images of this crater in our database because the area is usually cloud and/or haze covered. On this early morning pass, looking| nadir for a circular lake just southeast of the urban area of Kumasi and taking overlapping frames) Galapagos Islands, Ecuador (HMS Beagle site: On October 1, 1835 Darwin landed on Isabela Island. He found the island arid and sterile. Water which collected in pits was discovered to be bad for drinking. On October 20th, he left the Galapagos and set sail for Tahiti. Looking nadir to right of track for a context view of Isabela Island) and Apia, Samoa (Apia is the capital and largest city of Samoa. It is located on the central north coast of Upolu, Samoa's second largest island. The population in 2006 was 37,708. Looking left of track.)

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):

--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/26/10 -- Progress M-05M/37P undock
10/27/10 -- Progress M-08M/40P launch
10/29/10 -- Progress M-08M/40P docking
11/01/10 -- STS-133/Discovery launch (ULF5 - ELC4, PMM) ~4:40pm EDT
11/03/10 -- STS-133/Discovery docking ~1:13pm EDT
11/07/10 -- --------------Daylight Saving Time ends-----------
11/10/10 -- STS-133/Discovery undock ~5:40am EST
11/12/10 -- STS-133/Discovery landing (KSC) ~10:39am EST
11/12/10 -- Russian EVA-26
11/17/10 -- Russian EVA-27
11/30/10 -- Soyuz TMA-19/23S undock/landing (End of Increment 25)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/13/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S launch - Kondratyev (CDR-27)/Coleman/Nespoli
12/15/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/20/10 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking
02/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 "Johannes Kepler" launch
02/27/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 - ELC3, AMS-02)
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch - A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch - M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking
09/16/11 - Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch - D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 - Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/20/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/21/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/23/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch - O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA - on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
03/14/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/26/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch - G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
03/28/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 - Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch - S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 - Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch - K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 - Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch - C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 - Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 - Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 - Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------

// end //

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