NASA ISS On-Orbit Status 03 May 2012


image ISS On-Orbit Status 05/03/12

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

After breakfast, CDR Kononenko performed the routine inspection of the SM (Service Module) PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection.

For the latest INTEGRATED IMMUNE crew health survey, FE-5 Kuipers and later FE-6 Pettit completed the survey forms on an SSC (Station Support Computer) laptop and emailed the file to the experiment PI (Principal Investigator).

Afterwards, Kuipers performed his 4th (FD135/Flight Day 135) ICV (Integrated Cardiovascular) Resting Echo Scan in the US Lab, assisted by Don Pettit, serving as Operator/CMO (Crew Medical Officer) to operate the USND (Ultrasound) scans. [Wearing electrodes, ECG (Electrocardiograph) cable & VOX, André underwent the USND scan for ICV assessment, with video being recorded from the HRF (Human Research Facility) Ultrasound and COL cabin camera. Heart rate was tracked with the HRM (Heart Rate Monitor). There are dietary constraints, and no exercise is allowed 4 hrs prior to scan. After confirmed file transfer, the gear was powered down and stowed. Later, the data from the two HM-2 (Holter Monitor 2) HiFi Cards and two Actiwatch Spectrums were transferred from the USND-2 (Ultrasound 2) hard drive to the USND-2 USB drive. Voice required last 5 minutes for crew to inform ground copy process is complete. The USND echo experiment uses the Image Collector software on the laptop and requires VOX/Voice plus RT Video downlink during the activity. Goal of the ICV experiment is to quantify the extent, time course, and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy and identify its mechanisms. The ICV experiment consists of two separate but related activities over a one-week time period: an ultrasound echo scan & an ambulatory monitoring session. The sessions are scheduled at or around FD14, FD30, FD75, FD135 and R-15 (there are fewer sessions if mission duration is less than six months).]

Later, André also performed his 2nd in-flight ESA Vessel Imaging (Echography) ultrasound scans, assisted by Don as Operator, using the Image Collector software, with VOX/Voice plus real-time video downlink during the activity. [Vascular Echography (Vessel Imaging) evaluates the changes in central and peripheral blood vessel wall properties (thickness and compliance) and cross sectional areas of long-duration ISS crewmembers during and after long-term exposure to microgravity. An LBNP (Lower Body Negative Pressure) program will be run in parallel to Vessel Imaging. Flow velocity changes in the aorta and the middle cerebral and femoral arteries will be used to quantify the cardiovascular response to fluid shift. Vessel Imaging aims to optimize the countermeasures used routinely during long-duration space missions.]

Oleg meanwhile executed the periodic data dump from the BRI (SSR/Smart Switch Router) control log to the RSS1 laptop for downlink to the ground via OCA (Orbiter Communications Adapter).

Later, the CDR had ~1.5 hrs for upgrading Russian laptops RS1, RS2 & RS3 with the latest software version, supported by ground specialists tagup via VHF & S-band.

Kononenko then conducted the periodic checkout & performance verification of IP-1 airflow sensors in the various RS hatchways. [Inspected IP-1s are in the passageways PrK (SM Transfer Tunnel)-RO (SM Working Compartment), PkhO (SM Transfer Compartment)-RO, PkhO-DC1, PkhO-FGB PGO, PkhO-MRM2, FGB GA-MRM1, FGB PGO-FGB GA, and FGB GA-Node-1.]

FE-5 completed the weekly 10-min. CWC (Contingency Water Container) inventory as part of the on-going WRM (Water Recovery & Management) assessment of onboard water supplies. Updated "cue cards" based on the crew's water calldowns are sent up every other week for recording changes. WRM Update: A new WRM (Water Recovery Management) "cue card" was uplinked to the crew for their reference, updated with their latest CWC (Contingency Water Container) water audit. [The current card (31-0005) lists 16 CWCs (161.3 L total) for the five types of water identified on board: 1. Silver technical water (1 CWC with 25.5 L for Elektron electrolysis, plus 1 empty bag, all containing Wautersia bacteria; 2. Condensate water (3 CWCs with 14.0 L, plus 2 empty bags); 3. Iodinated water (7 CWCs with 121.8 L; and 4. Waste water (1 empty bag EMU waste water). Also one leaky CWC (#1024) with 8.5 L). Other CWCs are stowed behind racks and are currently not being tracked due to unchanging contents. Wautersia bacteria are typical water-borne microorganisms that have been seen previously in ISS water sources. These isolates pose no threat to human health.]

After setting up the video camcorder for downlinking their activities, Pettit & Kuipers had ~2.5 hrs for the scheduled IFM (Inflight Maintenance) on the CDRA ASV (Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Air Selector Valve), inspecting and cleaning the already removed valve which has been binding when switching between adsorption beds. [The task, at the MWA (Maintenance Work Area), was to carefully disassemble and restrain the ASV (9 components), with ports covered up, clean the valve seals and reassemble the device.]

Kononenko set up the A-R water transfer hose with BP pumping equipment and transferred water from Tank 1 of the ATV-3 WDS (Automated Transfer Vehicle 3 Water Delivery System) to a KOV EDV container (#823). [The 40-minute procedure is specially designed for gas/liquid separation, i.e., to prevent air bubbles larger than ~10 mm from getting into the Elektron's BZh Liquid Unit where they could cause Elektron shutdown.]

Oleg also spent about an hour with more cargo unloading & transfers from Progress 47P, docked at the DC1 Docking Compartment nadir port, to the ISS.

Later, the CDR took care of the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard "delta file" including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Oleg also completed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Don Pettit set up the partially deployed PPFS (Portable Pulmonary Function System) hardware with power, data, front panel, and gas connections, including MBS (Mixing Bag System) for his next session with VO2max (Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake & Submaximal Estimates of VO2max before, during and after long-duration space station missions), scheduled tomorrow. [The VO2max assessment uses the PPFS, CEVIS ergometer cycle, PFS (Pulmonary Function System) gas cylinders and mixing bag system, plus multiple other pieces of hardware to measure oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and more. The exercise protocol consists of a 2-min rest period, then three 5-min stages at workloads eliciting 25%, 50% & 75% of aerobic capacity as measured pre-flight, followed by a 25-watt increase in workload every minute until the crewmember reaches maximum exercise capacity. At that point, CEVIS workload increase is stopped, and a 5-min cool down period follows at the 25% load. Rebreathing measurements are initiated by the subject during the last minute of each stage. Constraints are: no food 2 hrs prior to exercise start, no caffeine 8 hrs prior to exercise, and must be well hydrated.]

In the MRM1 Rassvet module, Kononenko verified proper functioning of the Matryoshka RBO-3-2 Lulin-5 electronics box which is connected to the spherical sensor-equipped "phantom". [The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Note: Matryoshka is the name for the traditional Russian set of nested dolls.]

Oleg also completed his 9th data collection session for the psychological MBI-16 Vzaimodejstvie ("Interactions") program, accessing and completing the computerized study questionnaire on the RSE-Med laptop and saving the data in an encrypted file. [The software has a "mood" questionnaire, a "group & work environment" questionnaire, and a "critical incidents" log. Results from the study, which is also mirrored by ground control subjects, could help to improve the ability of future crewmembers to interact safely and effectively with each other and with Mission Control, to have a more positive experience in space during multi-cultural, long-duration missions, and to successfully accomplish mission activities.]

Working in the JAXA Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), Don Pettit fixed the coolant sampling adapter shutoff valve of the ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) by installing a releasable wire tie restraint to hold the valve in the closed position.

Don also closed the protective shutters of the Lab, Node-3/Cupola and JPM windows to prevent their contamination from ATV thrusters during tomorrow's scheduled ISS reboost.

Before Presleep, FE-5 will turn on the MPC (Multi-Protocol Converter) and start the Ku-band data flow of video recorded during the day to the ground, with POIC (Payload Operations & Integration Center) routing the onboard HRDL (High-Rate Data Link). After about an hour, André turns MPC routing off again. [This is a routine operation which regularly transmits HD onboard video (live or tape playback) to the ground on a daily basis before sleeptime.]

At ~2:25pm EDT, the crew had their standard bi-weekly teleconference with the JSC Astronaut Office/CB (Peggy Whitson), via S-band S/G-2 audio & phone patch.

The crew worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (FE-6), TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (CDR), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (CDR, FE-5, FE-6) and T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (FE-5).

Tasks listed for Kononenko on the Russian discretionary "time permitting" job for today were -
• RSE1 & RSE-Med laptop system disk maintenance (cleaning up for nominal Symantec Antivirus operation and conducting C-drive defragmentation as necessary),
• A ~30-min. session for Russia's EKON Environmental Safety Agency, making observations and taking KPT-3 aerial photography of environmental conditions on Earth using the NIKON D3X camera with the RSK-1 laptop, and
• More preparation & downlinking of reportages (written text, photos, videos) for the Roskosmos website to promote Russia's manned space program (max. file size 500 Mb).
ISS/ATV Reboost: Tomorrow morning at 4:37am EDT, a one-burn ISS reboost with ATV-3 "Edoardo Amaldi" OCS (Orbit Correction System) thrusters will be conducted for a duration of 20 min 21 sec and a delta-V of 3.0 m/s (9.84 ft/s), resulting in a predicted mean altitude increase of 5.30 km (2.81 nmi). Purpose of the reboost is to set up phasing for Soyuz 30S launch.

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uplinked for today were West African dust plume (plume continues across the Atlantic Ocean. Aiming camera left and right, shortly after crossing the Brazilian coastline. Every month of the year Saharan dust reaches the western hemisphere, usually not in such dense [visible] form as seen now. Interestingly, Saharan dust is thought to seed the soils of Amazonia with micronutrients critical for rainforest growth-in an "intercontinental biogeochemical connection" between Africa and South America. Some scientists also have suggested that Saharan dust may have carried harmful pathogens to the corals of the Caribbean Sea), Rome, Italy (CAPITAL CITIES COLLECTION. Shooting right near the circular Lake di Bracciano, for this capital city of just more than 2.8 million people), Minsk, Belarus (CAPITAL CITIES COLLECTION. Looking left of track for this capital city of more than 1.8 million people. Visual cues are two large deforested patches south of the city), and Moscow, Russia (CAPITAL CITIES COLLECTION. Looking well left for this capital city of 11.5 million people. Visual cue is a major forest boundary trending NE towards the city).

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 11:24am EDT [= epoch])
Mean altitude - 394.4 km
Apogee height - 400.9 km
Perigee height - 387.8 km
Period -- 92.45 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0009645
Solar Beta Angle -- -22.9 deg (magnitude increasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.58
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours -- 57 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) -- 77,107
Time in orbit (station) -- 4913 days
Time in orbit (crews, cum.) -- 4200 days

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
xx/xx/12 -- SpaceX Dragon launch
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S launch - G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/S.Revin
05/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
07/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
07/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S launch - S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
07/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking
07/20/12 -- HTV3 launch (~10:18pm EDT)
07/22/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P undock
07/24/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P re-docking
07/30/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P undocking/deorbit
07/31/12 -- Progress M16M/48P launch
08/02/12 -- Progress M16M/48P docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
10/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch - K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
10/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/01/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P launch
11/03/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P docking
11/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/05/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch - C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
12/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/26/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P launch
12/28/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P docking
03/19/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/02/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch - P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
04/04/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/16/13 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch - M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/31/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch - M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch - K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------

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