NASA ISS On-Orbit Status 16 July 2012


image ISS On-Orbit Status 07/16/12

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below. Ahead: Week 3 of Increment 32 (three/six-person crew).

Short duty day for the crew: Sleep cycle shift to accommodate tomorrow morning's Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking (~12:50am EDT).
· Wake 1 (this morning): 2:00am
· Sleep (today): 11:30am
· Wake 2 (tonight): 8:00pm
· Docking (tomorrow): 12:50am
· Sleep (tomorrow): 12:00pm
· Wake 3 (7/18): 2:00am (normal)

At wakeup, Gennady Padalka performed the routine inspection of the SM (Service Module) PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection. The CDR also conducted the weekly checkup behind ASU/toilet panel 139 in the SM of a fluid connector (MNR-NS) of the SM-U urine collection system, looking for potential moisture.

Sergei Revin conducted the periodic checkup of the circuit breakers & fuses in the MRM1 Rassvet & MRM2 Poisk modules. [The monthly checkup in DC1, MRM1 & MRM2 looks at AZS circuit breakers on the BVP Amp Switch Panel (they should all be On) and the LEDs (light-emitting diodes) of 14 fuses in fuse panels BPP-30 & BPP-36. MRM2 & MRM1 were derived from the DC1 concept and are very similar to it.]

The three crewmembers donned their intravehicular Sokol pressure suits and performed the standard fit-check in their body-contoured Kazbek-U couches in the TMA-04M/30S spacecraft (#704, docked at MRM2 Poisk), a 30-min job. [This required them to get in their shock-absorbing seats and use a ruler to measure the gap between the top of the head and the top edge of the structure facing the head. The results were to be reported to TsUP. Kazbek-U couches are designed to withstand g-loads during launch and orbital insertion as well as during reentry and brake-rocket-assisted landing. Each seat has two positions: cocked (armed) and non-cocked. In the cocked position, they are raised to allow the shock absorbers to function during touchdown. The fit check assures that the crewmember whose body gains in length during longer-term stay in zero-G, will still be adequately protected by the seat liners for their touchdown in Kazakhstan. 30S return is scheduled for 9/17.]

Joe completed his 3rd session with the MedOps psychological evaluation experiment WinSCAT (Spaceflight Cognitive Assessment Tool for Windows), logging in on the MEC laptop and going through the psychological evaluation exercise on the PC-based WinSCAT application. [WinSCAT is a monthly time-constrained questionnaire test of cognitive abilities, routinely performed by astronauts aboard the ISS every 30 days before or after the PHS (periodic health status) test or on special CDR's, crewmembers or flight surgeons request. The test uses cognitive subtests that measure sustained concentration, verbal working memory, attention, short-term memory, spatial processing, and math skills. The five cognitive subtests are Coding Memory - Learning, Continuous Processing Task (CPT), Match to Sample, Mathematics, and Coding Delayed Recall. These WinSCAT subtests are the same as those used during NASA's long-duration bed rest studies.]

Sergei performed the periodic service of the RS (Russian Segment) radiation payload suite "Matryoshka-R" (RBO-3-2), collecting eight Bubble dosimeters (A41, A42, A43, A44, A45, A46, A47, A48) to read their recorded radiation traces in a special Reader. Afterwards the dosimeters were re-initialized for new measurements, redeployed at specific locations and photographed. [The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Note: Matryoshka is the name for the traditional Russian set of nested dolls.]

After setting up the Lab video camcorder to provide live "over-the-shoulder" viewing from the ground, Joe configured the laptop-based HTV ROBoT trainer and started it up for a training session for HTV2 rendezvous & capture procedures. Afterwards, FE-3 tagged up with the ground for a conference and stowed the video gear. [The training lesson walks through the HTV3 steps in the rendezvous procedures and provides representative RWS (Robotics Workstation) and PCS (Portable Computer System) screenshots for each step, using two laptops, an A31p for the visual displays and a T61p for the simulator. In addition, the lesson gives an overview of the HTV commands that are available to the crew and explains how to execute the commands via both the HCP and the HTV PCS pages.]

In the JAXA JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), Acaba worked on the ER5 (EXPRESS Rack 5) at loc. F1, recovering its utility drawer by checking the condition of the drawer lid latches and using flat head screw drivers to wedge the utility drawer lid down to open the drawer.

FE-2 was scheduled to refresh ISS cabin atmosphere with another 1-hr O2 (oxygen) repress from Progress M-15M/47P SRPK tankage on TsUP Go.

Revin also handled the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

Later, working from his discretionary "as time permits" task list, Sergei conducted the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard "delta file" including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Padalka started a new round of periodic preventive maintenance of RS ventilation systems, cleaning "Group B" fan screens in the SM.

Acaba conducted a session with the U.S. HMS VIS (Health Maintenance Systems / Visual Acuity) testing program which uses an eye chart for both far & near visual acuity and an eye questionnaire (DCT/Data Collection Tool), to be filled out with test data and downloaded on a laptop for ground access. It was Joe's 2nd time.

Later, Joe closed the protective shutters of the Lab, Node-3/Cupola and JPM (JEM Pressurized Module) windows to prevent their contamination from thruster effluents during Soyuz 31P docking.

Sergei meanwhile performed the periodic (every Monday) verification of the automatic IUS AntiVirus definition update on the Russian VKS auxiliary network laptops RSS1, RSS2, RSK1-T61p & RSK2, as well as performed the manual update on the non-network laptops RSE-Med & RSE1. [Antivirus update procedures have changed since the SSCV4 software update. Before the installation (on 8/8) of the new automated procedure, the refresh was done manually on Mondays on RSS2, copying the files to the RSS2 service folder, then launching update scripts on the network laptops RSS1, RSK1-T61p & RSK2 and finally manually updating non-network laptops RSE-Med & RSE1. On Tuesdays, the anti-virus scanning results are regularly verified on all laptops. Nominally, Russian network laptops have software installed for automatic anti-virus update; fresh data is copied on RSK1-T61p & RRSK2 every time a computer is rebooted with a special login, and on RSS1 once daily. On Russian non-network laptops antivirus definition file update is done by the crew once every two weeks on Monday.]

Acaba again had a time slot/placeholder reserved for making entries in his electronic Journal on the personal SSC. [Required are three journaling sessions per week.]

Before exercising on the TVIS treadmill, Revin set up and checked out the G1 video camera for it to record his and Padalka's workout session on the machine, meeting the regular 30-day requirement for biomechanical evaluation of the on-orbit crewmembers, and evaluation of the hardware status. Afterwards, the video footage was stowed by Sergei.

The crew worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (CDR, FE-2), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (FE-3), and VELO ergometer bike with load trainer (CDR).

Tasks listed for Revin & Padalka on the Russian discretionary "time permitting" job for today were -

• A ~30-min. session for Russia's EKON Environmental Safety Agency, making observations and taking KPT-3 aerial photography of environmental conditions on Earth using the NIKON D3X camera with the RSK-1 laptop,
• Earth photography of the current flooding conditions in Russia's Kuban region, and
• More preparation & downlinking of reportages (written text, photos, videos) for the Roskosmos website to promote Russia's manned space program (max. file size 500 Mb).


No CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uplinked for today.

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 9:24am EDT [= epoch])
Mean altitude - 398.6 km
Apogee height - 403.2 km
Perigee height - 394.1 km
Period -- 92.53 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0006697
Solar Beta Angle -- -18.4 deg (magnitude increasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.56
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours -- 78 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) - 78,258
Time in orbit (station) -- 4987 days
Time in orbit (crews, cum.) -- 4274 days.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
07/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking -- ~12:50am EDT
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
07/18/12 -- ATV/ISS reboost
07/20/12 -- HTV3 launch (~10:18pm EDT)
07/22/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P undock #1 ~4:22pm EDT
07/23/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P Kurs-NA Test
07/23/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P re-docking ~9:55pm EDT
07/27/12 -- HTV3 docking
07/30/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P undocking #2 ~2:11pm EDT
08/01/12 -- Progress M-16M/48P launch [4-orbit RDVZ] ~3:35pm EDT
08/01/12 -- Progress M-16M/48P launch [34-orbit RDVZ] ~3:38pm EDT
08/01/12 -- Progress M-16M/48P docking [4-orbit RDVZ] ~9:24pm EDT
08/03/12 -- Progress M-16M/48P docking [34-orbit RDVZ] ~6:14pm EDT
08/16/12 -- Russian EVA-31
08/30/12 -- US EVA-18
09/06/12 -- HTV3 undocking
09/08/12 -- HTV3 reentry
09/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/25/12 -- ATV3 undocking
10/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch - K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitsky/E.Tarelkin
10/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/01/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P launch
11/03/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P docking
11/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/05/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch - C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
12/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/26/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P launch
12/28/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P docking
03/19/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/02/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch - P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
04/04/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/16/13 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch - M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/31/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch - M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch - K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------


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