NASA ISS On-Orbit Status 3 August 2012


image ISS On-Orbit Status 08/03/12

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

At wakeup, Gennady Padalka performed the routine inspection of the SM PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection.

Upon wakeup, FE-3 Acaba, FE-5 Williams & FE-6 Hoshide completed their weekly post-sleep session of the Reaction Self-Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self-Test on the ISS) protocol, the 26th for Joe, the 5th for Suni & Aki. [RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

FE-5 Williams had Day 5 of her first (FD15) suite of sessions with the controlled Pro K diet protocol (Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery) with diet logging after the urine pH spot test, for a 5-day period after start of collections. In addition to closing out the associated 24-hr urine sample collections, Sunita also underwent the generic blood draw by self-phlebotomy, photo-documented by Joe Acaba, then set up the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) in COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory) for spinning the samples prior to stowing them in the JPM MELFI (JEM Pressurized Module Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS). Later, Suni also stowed the equipment used for the urine and blood collections. [The operational products for blood & urine collections for the HRP (Human Research Program) payloads were revised some time ago, based on crew feedback, new cold stowage hardware, and IPV capabilities. Generic blood & urine procedures have been created to allow an individual crewmember to select their payload complement and see specific requirements populated. Individual crewmembers will select their specific parameter in the procedures to reflect their science complement. Different crewmembers will have different required tubes and hardware configurations, so they must verify their choice selection before continuing with operations to ensure their specific instruction. For Pro K, there are five in-flight sessions (FD15, FD30, FD60, FD120, FD180) of samplings, to be shared with the NUTRITION w/Repository protocol, each one with five days of diet & urine pH logging and photography on the last day (science sessions are often referred to by Flight Day 15, 30, 60, etc. However, there are plus/minus windows associated with these time points so a "Flight Day 15" science session may not actually fall on the crewmember's 15th day on-orbit). The crewmember prepares a diet log and then annotates quantities of food packets consumed and supplements taken. On Days 4 & 5, urine collections are spread over 24 hrs; samples go into the MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS) within 30 min after collection. Blood samples, on the last day, are centrifuged in the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) and placed in MELFI at -80 degC. There is an 8-hr fasting requirement prior to the blood draw (i.e., no food or drink, but water ingestion is encouraged). MELFI constraints: Maximum MELFI Dewar open time: 60 sec; at least 45 min between MELFI dewar door openings. Background on pH: In chemistry, pH (Potential Hydrogen) is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a watery solution. Pure water is neutral, with a pH close to 7.0 at 25 degC. Solutions with a pH less than 7 are "acidic" and solutions with a pH greater than 7 are "basic" or "alkaline". pH measurements are important in medicine, biology, chemistry, agriculture, forestry, food science, environmental science, oceanography, civil engineers and many others.]

FE-3 Acaba serviced the YTSL (YouTube SpaceLab) Spider Habitat, deactivating CGBA-4 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 4), taking photos of Spider Hab2, then feeding Spider Hab2, swapping Spider Hab1 with Hab2, closing up, re-cabling and reactivating CGBA-4

After setting up the necessary equipment, Sunita & Akihiko took turns being subject and operator of their first session with the periodic 30-min US PHS (Periodic Health Status)/Without Blood Labs exam, with Sunita acting as CMO (Crew Medical Officer). FE-3 then logged the data and stowed the equipment. A subjective evaluation was part of the test. [The assessment used the AMP (Ambulatory Medical Pack), stethoscope, oral disposable thermometer and ABPC (Automatic Blood Pressure Cuff) from the ALSP (Advanced Life Support Pack). All data were then logged on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) and the hardware stowed. The PHS exam is guided by special IFEP (In-Flight Examination Program) software on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) laptop.]

Padalka took two photos of the internal part of the DC1 docking port's SSVP-StM docking cone to obtain digital imagery of the scratch or scuff mark left by the head of the Progress 48P active docking probe on the internal surface of the passive drogue (docking cone) ring, a standard practice after Russian dockings, then downlinking the pictures via OCA assets. [These images are used to refine current understanding of docking conditions. The objective is to take photo imagery of the scratch or scuff marks left by the head of the docking probe on the internal surface of the drogue (docking cone, ASP) ring, now rotated out of the passageway. Before shooting the picture, the cosmonaut highlights the scuffmark with a marker and writes the date next to it. As other crewmembers before him, Gennady used the Nikon D2X digital still camera to take the pictures with the hatch partially closed.]

Gennady also conducted the periodic replacement of the SRV-K2M's sediment trap insert (VU) in the SM. [The VU insert was last inspected on 7/31/12. The Russian SRVK-2M converts collected condensate into drinking water and dispenses the reclaimed potable water.]

Working in the newly arrived Progress 48P, Yuri Malenchenko removed the Docking Mechanism and installed two handles on the front of the hatch cover.

Also in the Progress M-16M/48P cargo vehicle, Yuri installed & hooked up the electronic LKT local temperature sensor commutator (TA251MB) of the BITS2-12 onboard telemetry measurement system and its PZU-1M ROM (read-only memory) unit.

FE-2 Revin activated the TBU Incubator at +4degC for subsequent BTKh payload activation hick-ups.

Sergei also performed standard service on the running experiment TEKh-22 "Identifikatsiya" (Identification) in MRM1 by downloading the new batch of structural dynamics measurements of the IMU-Ts microaccelerometer to the RSE1 laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground via OCA; [IMU-Ts is a part of the MRM1 SBI onboard measurement system, installed in PGO behind panel 104.] and

Later, Revin completed the routine replacement of the АSU toilet КТО, KBO, EDV-SV & ЕDV-U container units.

Gennady, Yuri & Sergei spent several hours transferring cargo from the Progress to the ISS for stowage.

The CDR & FE-2 brought the onboard ODF (Operations Data Files) material up to date using Progress 48P-delivered files.

Revin later transferred from Progress - BTKh-26 KASKAD bioreactor to SM, setting it up at +4 degC,
BTKh-29 Zhenshen-2 payload to MRM2, and
BTKh-39 ASEPTIC payload hardware to MRM1.

At ~12:55pm EDT, Acaba concluded his 3rd ICV (Integrated Cardiovascular) Ambulatory Monitoring session, doffing the two Actiwatches and HM2 (Holter Monitor 2) about 24 hrs after the end of yesterday's "midpoint" activity (~12:35pm), then powered on the laptop and downloaded the data from the two Actiwatch Spectrums, copied the data from the 2 HM2 HiFi CF Cards to the HRF PC and downloaded Cardiopres data. [For the ICV Ambulatory Monitoring session, during the first 24 hrs (while all devices are worn), ten minutes of quiet, resting breathing are timelined to collect data for a specific analysis. The nominal exercise includes at least 10 minutes at a heart rate ≥120 bpm (beats per minute). After 24 hrs, the Cardiopres/BP is doffed and the HM2 HiFi CF Card and AA Battery are changed out to allow continuation of the session for another 24 hours, with the Makita batteries switched as required. After data collection is complete, the Actiwatches and both HM2 HiFi CF Cards are downloaded to the HRF PC1, while Cardiopres data are downloaded to the EPM (European Physiology Module) Rack and transferred to the HRF PC1 via a USB key for downlink.]

Suni Williams deployed & updated the ODF Warning & Emergency Books. [This involved stowing the stage deploy ODF in a bag for retainment, replacing ammonia detection kits with ammonia measurement kits launched on HTV3 and ammonia response procedures booklets launched on 48P, incorporating EMER-1 PCNs (Page Change Notices), and deploying EMER-1, EMER-2 & Warning books.]

In the US A/L (Airlock), Williams initiated the regular battery maintenance charge/discharge cycle on EVA batteries in the BSA (Battery Stowage Assembly).

In the JAXA JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), Aki Hoshide removed & replaced the TCA-L PPA (Thermal Control Assembly for Low Temperature Loop / Pump Package Assembly), mated the rack umbilical to enable checkout by SSIPC (Space Station Integration & Promotion Center) and installed a desiccant bag at the PPA. [The pump has been down since the initial RPC (Remote Power Controller) trip on 3/26. As a result of the troubleshooting in late June, it was determined that the failure was internal to the pump. This morning the crew replaced the ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) pump in the Kibo module with no issues. It's up and running. The JEM ITCS is back to the nominal dual loop mode.]

After conducting a review of JEMRMS DOUG (JEM Robotic Manipulator System / Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics) procedures, Aki & Joe conducted RMS ops training sessions in preparation for the upcoming transfers of the MCE (Multi-mission Consolidated Equipment) payload from the HTV3 EP (Exposed Platform).

FE-6 configured two Actiwatches for the JAXA experiment BR48 (Biological Rhythms 48/BIORHYTHMS) experiment for Hoshide (#9001) & Williams (#9002) using Actiware Software and the medical laptop. [The crewmember puts an Actiwatch on the wrist whereupon the measurement starts automatically, and stows another Actiwatch into Holter Soft Bag.]

The crew worked out on the TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (CDR, FE-2, FE-4), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (FE-2, FE-3, FE-56, T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (FE-#, FE-6), and VELO ergometer bike with load trainer (CDR, FE-4).

Joe Acaba conducted his session on the T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill with the Treadmill Kinematics protocol, setting up the HD camcorder in Node-1, placing tape markers on his body, recording a calibration card in the FOV (Field of View) and then conducting the workout run within a specified speed range. The video was later downlinked by Joe via MPC (Multi-Protocol Converter). [Purpose of the Kinematics T2 experiment is to collect quantitative data by motion capture from which to assess current exercise prescriptions for participating ISS crewmembers. Detailed biomechanical analyses of locomotion will be used to determine if biomechanics differ between normal and microgravity environments and to determine how combinations of external loads and exercise speed influence joint loading during in-flight treadmill exercise. Such biomechanical analyses will aid in understanding potential differences in gait motion and allow for model-based determination of joint & muscle forces during exercise. The data will be used to characterize differences in specific bone and muscle loading during locomotion in the two gravitational conditions. By understanding these mechanisms, appropriate exercise prescriptions can be developed that address deficiencies.]

At ~4:15am EDT, the six crewmembers held the regular (nominally weekly) tagup with the Russian Main Flight Control Team (GOGU/Glavnaya operativnaya gruppa upravleniya), including Shift Flight Director (SRP), at TsUP-Moscow via S-band/audio, phone-patched from Houston and Moscow.

At ~4:30am, Gennady, Sergei & Yuri linked up with TsUP-Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

At ~3:25pm, the crew will hold their regular weekly tagup with the Lead Flight Director at JSC/MCC-Houston.

Tasks listed for Revin, Malenchenko & Padalka on the Russian discretionary "time permitting" job for today were - A ~30-min. session for Russia's EKON Environmental Safety Agency, making observations and taking KPT-3 aerial photography of environmental conditions on Earth using the NIKON D3X camera with the RSK-1 laptop, and
More preparation & downlinking of reportages (written text, photos, videos) for the Roskosmos website to promote Russia's manned space program (max. file size 500 Mb).

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
08/16/12 -- Russian EVA-31
08/30/12 -- US EVA-18
09/06/12 -- HTV3 undocking
09/08/12 -- HTV3 reentry
09/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/25/12 -- ATV3 undocking
10/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch - K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitsky/E.Tarelkin
10/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/01/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P launch
11/03/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P docking
11/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/05/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch - C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
12/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/26/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P launch
12/28/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P docking
03/19/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/02/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch - P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
04/04/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/16/13 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch - M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/31/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch - M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch - K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------

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