NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE Images - February 20, 2013


- Fault in Ius Chasma http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_025231_1720

This image in Ius Chasma, a portion of the massive canyon system Vallis Marineris, draws our attention because a fault previously imaged by the Mars Orbiter Camera.

- Cratered Cones in the Cydonia Region http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_025439_2210

This observation focuses on an unusally high density of cratered cones, imaged previously by the Mars Orbiter Camera. These cones could possibly be mud volcanoes.

- More Impact Craters from MSL http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_030524_1755

MSL released 8 tungsten masses during its entry and descent, leaving some resulting craters we captured enhanced color.

- Delta Structure in Eberswalde Crater http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_001336_1560

This delta is distinguished from other fan-shaped deposits on Mars by the presence of a preserved distributary network including lobes, inverted channels, and meander cutoffs.

All of the HiRISE images are archived here: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/

Information about the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is online at http://www.nasa.gov/mro. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, of Denver, is the prime contractor and built the spacecraft. HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., built the HiRISE instrument.

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