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NASA Aqua Satellite sees Typhoon Kilo headed west

Status Report From: NASA HQ
Posted: Friday, September 4, 2015


Caption: The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite made several passes over the Pacific Ocean on Sept. 3 and captured Typhoon Kilo (left) and Hurricanes Ignacio (center) and Jimena (right) across the Pacific Ocean. Credit Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Typhoon Kilo is the westernmost tropical cyclone of a four storms in the Pacific Ocean basin on September 4. From west to east they include Typhoon Kilo, Hurricane Ignacio, Hurricane Jimena and Tropical Storm Kevin.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Kilo and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument took an image of the storm that showed Kilo maintained an eye and thick bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the low-level center. Kilo also appeared more symmetric in the MODIS image.

At 11 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. HST/1500 UTC) the center of Typhoon Kilo was located near latitude 24.0 north and longitude 166.0 west. That's 702 nautical miles east-northeast of Wake Island.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted Kilo was moving toward the southwest near 1 knot (1 mph/2 kph). Maximum sustained winds are near 80 knots (92 mph/148 kph).

JTWC expects Kilo to re-intensify over the next several days and peak at 120 knots by September 6 over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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