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NASA Education Express Message -- Nov. 10, 2016

Status Report From: NASA Education Office
Posted: Thursday, November 10, 2016

New This Week!

 

 

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students

Informational Webinar: Nov. 11, 2016 at 9 a.m. EDT

Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

 

Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA's Digital Learning Network

Audience: All Educators and Students

Event Dates: Nov. 17, 2016, 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST

 

Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest 

Audience: Students 4 to 12 Years Old

Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

 

Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge

Audience: Educators and Students Ages 5 to 19

Entry Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017

 

Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes

Audience: High School Students

Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

 

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year

Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students

Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

 

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

Audience: Undergraduate Sophomores and Juniors at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions (Awardees must be classified as juniors or seniors during the 2017-2018 academic year)

Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017

 

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

Audience: Graduate Students at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions

Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017

 

 

 

PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…

 

 

Sign Up for NASA Education 'Science WOW!' Weekly Email Newsletter

Audience: All Educators and Students

 

Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA's Digital Learning Network

Audience: All Educators and Students

Next Event: Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST

 

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars

Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

Next Event Date: Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT

 

Join NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events

Audience: All Educators and Students

Event Dates: Now Through Nov. 13, 2016

 

National Science Foundation's East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

Audience: U.S. Graduate Students

Application Deadline: Nov. 10, 2016

 

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program

Audience: K-8 and Informal Educators

Kickoff Event Date: Nov. 14, 2016

 

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

 

Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students

Next Webcast Date: Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

 

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

Audience: K-12 STEM Educators

Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

 

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series -- Attend in Person or View Online

Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education 

Next Lecture Date: Nov. 17, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST) 

 

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

Audience: Higher Education Students

Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

 

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students

Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

 

2017 BIG Idea Challenge

Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty

Proposal Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

 

Call for Submissions -- NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations

Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

 

NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble

Audience: All Educators and Students

 

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions

 

 

 

 

Don't miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.

For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA's website:

-- Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html

-- Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 

 

 

NEW THIS WEEK!

 

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

A question-and-answer teleconference will take place on Nov. 11, 2016, at 9 a.m. EST. Groups who previously have flown experiments on HASP, as well as new organizations, are encouraged to attend. To participate, dial in to 1-844-467-4685 a few minutes before conference time. When requested, enter the conference ID number 780290 followed by the # key.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

 

 


Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA's Digital Learning Network

Join NASA's Digital Learning Network in celebrating American Education Week, Nov. 14-18, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in a virtual career panel with experts from various disciplines across NASA on Nov. 17, 2016. The all-day event will feature 30-minute discussions from NASA professionals at the top of each hour.

8-8:30 a.m. EST -- Kick-off with Kennedy Space Center Director Astronaut Robert Cabana
Robert Cabana is a former NASA astronaut, currently serving as director of NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In his current role, Cabana manages all NASA facilities and activities at the spaceport, including the team of civil service and contractor employees who operate and support numerous space programs and projects.

9-9:30 a.m. EST -- Josh Fody, Thermal Engineer at Langley Research Center (Project: CHIEFS)

Josh Fody is a thermal engineer on the CHIEFS project who is working on designing a Ceramic Matrix Composite heat exchanger with tubeless imbedded cooling channels. The purpose of the application is to keep engine combustion section walls cooler longer for hypersonic aircraft.

10-10:30 a.m. EST -- Kurt Leucht, Software Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Project: Swarmies)
Kurt Leucht is a software engineer at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. For much of his 25-year career, he has developed command and control systems and also robotic systems that are used for in-situ resource utilization, or ISRU, research projects. These ISRU robots could support future human Mars missions where astronauts will live off the land to survive and thrive.

11-11:30 a.m. EST -- Kate Cryderman, Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Projects: RESOLVE, LAVA)
Kate Cryderman is an engineer on RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction) -- the primary payload on the Resource Prospector mission planned for launch in the early 2020s. The Resource Prospector will prospect for lunar volatiles to better understand how local materials can be used to support exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cryderman works on the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis, or LAVA, subsystem, where her primary responsibilities include hardware integration and testing to support design trade studies and flight hardware development.

Noon-12:30 p.m. EST -- Margaret Domingues, Optical Engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center (Graduate Coop, Pathways Intern)
Domingues is an optical engineer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight center. She originally came to Goddard as a summer intern, and then as a graduate COOP. She received her graduate degree from the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. In the optics branch at Goddard, she been working on optical engineering and testing for the James Webb Space Telescope.

1-1:30 p.m. EST -- Anne Meier, Chemical Engineer at Kennedy Space Center
Anne Meier is a chemical engineer at NASA's Kennedy Space Center working on several projects that focus on deep space exploration and resource reutilization for human spaceflight. One project is an in-situ resource reutilization system called the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module. The Atmospheric Processing Module is a system that collects and converts the carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using dual cryocoolers and converts the carbon dioxide into methane (fuel) and water. Another project includes the development of a system that converts logistical space trash into useful byproducts for volume reduction and fuel production. As a crew member of the 2014 HI-SEAS Mars analog simulation, Meier took part in a 120-day psychological study and performed various research projects while living in an isolated Mars-like habitat with an international crew.

2-2:30 p.m. EST -- Michael Cooney, Electrical Engineer at Langley Research Center (Projects: MEDLI2, GL-10)
Michael Cooney is an electrical engineer designing and testing hardware for the MEDLI2 experiment, an instrument suite to be installed in the heat shield and backshell of the Mars 2020 aeroshell. He also is working in a systems engineering capacity on the GL-10, an all-electrical, Vertical Take Off and Landing Unmanned Air Vehicle. Cooney recently has worked on designing hardware for multiple CubeSat missions. Before joining NASA Langley, Cooney worked and attended college at the University of Hawaii.

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo. Three schools will be selected to interact with speakers during each event. To apply for this special opportunity, visit https://goo.gl/forms/ZqyJZj5edCCIz4np2.

For additional details about the events and more information about the featured experts, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln/American-Education-Week

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

 


Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest


NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is holding an artwork contest for students 4 to 12 years old. The artwork will be used to create a 2017 calendar. Each month will have a different theme related to the International Space Station, astronauts, growing food in space and more! Unique and original artwork will be selected for each month. Once the calendar is complete, NASA will transmit it to astronauts aboard the space station. The calendar also will include supplemental education materials for kids on Earth to learn more about the space-related themes.

Entries are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For complete contest rules and submission guidelines, visit http://www.nasa.gov/feature/commercial-crew-2017-calendar-artwork-contest.

Please direct questions about this contest to ksc-connect2ccp@mail.nasa.gov.

 


Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge


Calling all students! NASA wants your help to design an object that could be used by an astronaut to maintain physical health on a three-year mission to Mars. The Mars Medical Challengeis the fifth in a series of Future Engineers Challengeswhere students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model intended to be printed in 3-D and used for a wide range of medical needs including diagnostic, preventive, first-aid, emergency, surgical and/or dental purposes.

As NASA continues to investigate how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, radiation and stress that occur long-duration spaceflight, Future Engineers proposes to engage students with a related challenge. The Mars Medical Challenge asks students to design a 3-D printed object that will keep astronauts healthy during the long trip to the Red Planet. Specifically, medical and dental hardware will be emphasized during this challenge.

Students ages 5-19 are invited to become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs for hardware that could be used by astronauts on a future mission to Mars. Students have the opportunity to win prizes ranging from a Mars prize pack or a 3-D printer for their school to a trip to Houston for a tour of NASA's Johnson Space Center. The challenge closes on Jan. 25, 2017, and winners will be announced on March 28, 2017.

What health-related items do you think an astronaut will need on that journey, and why would these items require a 3-D printer? It’s time to start flexing your problem-solving and design skills to find a solution – good luck!

For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/marsmedical.

 


Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes


The National Science Foundation and the National Nanotechnology Initiative invite high school students to take part in the Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes competition. This contest challenges high school students to focus on a particular mission for society and then design nanotechnology-enabled gear for an original superhero.

Students can envision gear that is grounded in current research but not yet possible, a process in which they learn about the potentials and limitations of real-world nanotechnology. Students will first identify one societal mission from a list of four to address and then submit an entry with three parts: a written section, a short comic strip and a 90-second video.

Each submission must be made by an individual student or a team of two or three students. All entrants must be U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. Participants must be enrolled in a high school or home schooled in the U.S., its territories, or possessions at the time of entry.

Submissions are due at 11:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/GenNano. Questions about this competition may be directed to gennano@nsf.gov.

 


NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year

Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship program is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in Earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2017-2018 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA's scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. Financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate's four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $45,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2f2baB3.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov

 


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering or mathematics).

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal, and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Participants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and NASA's mission. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least two years of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a junior or senior during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to VSGC@odu.edu.

 


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium's Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this research fellowship in science, technology, engineering and mathematics is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA's mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active facultymentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and NASA's mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory progress in academics and research.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit to recognize high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 13, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions to VSGC@odu.edu.

 

 

PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…

 

 

Sign Up for NASA Education 'Science WOW!' Weekly Email Newsletter

 

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

 

Science starts with a question, and so does "Science WOW!" Each week's message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. "Science WOW!" also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

 

Plus, "Science WOW!" delivers -- right to your inbox -- the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It's a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

 

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

 

 

 

Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA's Digital Learning Network

 

Join NASA's Digital Learning Network in celebrating National Distance Learning Week, Nov. 7-11, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in one or more of the special programs listed below and visit their website for classroom lessons and special events throughout the year.

 

From the DLN at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center: STEM Shorts

Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST -- Math: How Does Math Relate to the Solar Eclipse?

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc

Explore solar eclipses with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center through the new STEM Shorts digital program! Each presentation will be a brief 15-minute informational lesson followed by a live question and answer session from the audience. Questions can be submitted via twitter @GSFCEducation using #STEMShorts or by email to gsfceducation@gmail.com. Please contact Lindsey Jones at lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov for more information or general inquiries about the program.

 

From the DLN at NASA's Kennedy Space Center: NASA STARS en Español With Alex Bengoa From NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations Program

Nov. 10, 2016, at Noon EST

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo

NASA STARS en Español promotes awareness of NASA’s diverse career opportunities for minority populations and highlights Hispanic professionals as role models in STEM careers. This monthly webcast is live-streamed in Spanish. DLN invites you to participate with your STEM classes, Spanish classes, Spanish clubs, etc. Bring your classroom into the conversation because Students Talking About Real STEM are the STARS of tomorrow. Learn about November’s guest speaker at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/epdc-post/alex-j-bengoa/. Questions can be submitted during the event via Twitter using #NASASTARS or by email to astrosdenasa@gmail.com. For more information about the program, visit https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/.

 

NASA’s Digital Learning Network celebrates distance learning every day through a wide variety of programs that include:

-- DLN Interactive Classroom -- DLN specialists connect with one or more schools to deliver an interactive classroom lesson. Descriptions of the lessons can be found at: https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons.

-- DLN Live -- DLN specialists or subject matter experts present a special topic related to current events that may involve interviews, demonstrations and live questions from the audience.

-- DLN Virtual Visits -- The DLN specialists connects a subject matter expert with a specific classroom where topics about careers and NASA experiences are discussed.

-- DLN Virtual Field Trip -- A DLN specialist gives a virtual tour of points of interest such as a laboratory or launch on a NASA center.

 

For more information and other DLN events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

 

 

 

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

 

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

 

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Solar Eclipse 2017

Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12

Event Date: Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST

Participants in this webinar will discuss Solar Eclipse 2017 “Spotlights” for the classroom using NASA's unique resources. Educators will discover NASA websites, digital badging and applications to implement with students before next year's 2017 stellar event! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196478

 

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

 

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

 

 

 

Join NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events

 

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center will celebrate Maryland STEMFest 2016 in a very special way: by highlighting next year’s total solar eclipse! On Aug. 21, 2017, all 48 contiguous states will have the opportunity to view a solar eclipse -- an event that has not been seen across the lower 48 states in 38 years! The event will provide scientists the chance to collect valuable research on the sun, its corona and other features. Goddard’s programs for Maryland STEMFest 2016 will highlight the STEM behind solar eclipses, so please join us this year as we celebrate this monumental occasion! 

 

STEM@NASA Goddard: Library Edition -- NASA Heliophysics

Nov. 10, 2016, 5-6 p.m. EST

NASA heliophysics experts will be broadcast live to county libraries across Maryland. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the incredible work NASA does and the upcoming 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Contact your local library http://directory.sailor.lib.md.us/pub_use/county_map.cfm for more information on how to participate. Participants will be able to pose questions to NASA expert via email and Twitter. For more information on how to interact with our experts, please contact Jordan Snyder at jordan.a.snyder@nasa.gov.

 

New Interactive Classroom Experience From NASA's Digital Learning Network -- Our Magnificent Sun: Solar Eclipse 2017 Edition

Scheduling Options Available Nov. 4-13, 2016

http://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons#Our Magnificent Sun

With the solar eclipse of 2017 approaching, Our Magnificent Sun for younger grades will help students answer their questions about the sun in a highly interactive session. During this web-based, interactive classroom program, students illustrate features of the sun by participating in a story time. Our Magnificent Sun for upper grades uses a teachable moment to introduce space weather and answer questions students might have about a solar eclipse. 

 

Professional Development Opportunity: NASA Goddard’s Solar Eclipse Spotlight Digital Badge for Educators

Ongoing Throughout the School Year With Special Incentive for Completion Before Nov. 13, 2016

Digital badging is an online professional development process for certifying learning. The NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System allows you to select from a wide variety of STEM topics, engage in exciting learning opportunities, demonstrate your mastery of the topic, and receive a badge of accomplishment for your work that you can share with others. The latest NASA Goddard Solar Eclipse Spotlight 2017 badge is a great way to prepare for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Educators who complete this digital badge by Nov. 13, 2016, will have the opportunity for priority scheduling to take part in a Solar Eclipse 2017 module from NASA’s Distance Learning Network.

 

To sign up, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and use the login buttons to begin exploring this digital badge as well as other exciting professional development opportunities available to you through the NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System. Please contact Kelly Kohli at kelly.kohli@nasa.gov for questions or additional information.

 

 

 

National Science Foundation's East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

 

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

 

EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master's or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics field supported by NSF. Applicants identify and contact host researchers on their own prior to submitting their EAPSI proposals. Lists of prospective host institutions are available at the opportunity website.

 

NSF provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. The program's foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations. (Arrangements vary by host location.) 

 

The application submission deadline for summer 2017 is Nov. 10, 2016.

 

For additional information about the program, including location-specific handbooks, a How to Apply guide, and helpful tips for applicants, visit www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

 

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to eapsi@nsf.gov.

 

 

 

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program

 

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Office of Education at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City invites K-8 STEM and informal educators to attend a series of professional development sessions to learn about the Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology Program! 

 

Become part of a STEM educator cohort to help improve STEM education experiences for your students and community. Participants will explore hands-on, NASA-themed engineering design challenges, attend presentations from NASA subject matter experts, and develop BEST STEM lesson to fit individual classroom needs. Participants will also receive supplementary NASA educational resources and the opportunity to join an ongoing STEM community of practice.

 

NASA's BEST activity guides bring the principles of engineering alive to younger audiences. The content in the guides can be used to supplement curricula during the school day or as activities for after-school clubs. Educators may use the materials as a set or as individual activities.

 

This professional development opportunity kicks off with a webinar on Nov. 14, 2016. Seven additional in-person training sessions will take place at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. Participants must attend all sessions to receive certificate of completion.

 

For more information, including a full list of session dates and registration details, visit http://smdepo.org/post/9102

 

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.

 

 

 

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

 

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

 

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

 

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

 

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

 

 

 

Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

 

The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called "STEM in 30." This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive "Cover It Live" feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

 

Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science on the Station

Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST

Do you like being poked, prodded and analyzed? If you said yes, then you may have a future as an astronaut. Astronauts on the International Space Station don’t just conduct scientific experiments -- they are part of an experiment themselves. Learning about the human factors of spaceflight is an important element to a future trip to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the effects of space on the humans who travel there.

 

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer

Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST

The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers' bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.

 

"STEM in 30" webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of "STEM in 30," please email STEMin30@si.edu for details. 

 

For more information about the Smithsonian's "STEM in 30" Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

 

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.

 

 

 

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

 

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

 

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline. 

 

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices. 

 

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

 

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

 

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

 

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.

 

 

 

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series -- Attend in Person or View Online

 

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL's Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program's missions, instruments and other technologies.

 

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL's Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College's Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

 

Next Lecture in the Series:

 

The James Webb Space Telescope: Successor to Hubble

Event Date: Nov. 17 and Nov. 18, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=11

After its launch in late 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope will help revolutionize study of the cosmos. Built to address the questions beyond the capabilities of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, JWST will look more deeply at infrared wavelengths with instruments with capabilities not previously available. Join Dr. Michael Ressler for a discussion about JWST as a whole but focused on the Mid-Infrared Instrument, the longest wavelength instrument on JWST.

 

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

 

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

 

 

 

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

 

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA's Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

 

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

 

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

 

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

 

Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

 

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

 

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.  

 

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

 

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.

 

 

 

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

 

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA's space exploration goals.

 

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA's Strategic Plan.

 

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

 

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

 

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one "cube," or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat's final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

 

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

 

For additional information about NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

 

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov

 

 

 

2017 BIG Idea Challenge

 

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

 

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA's Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

 

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

 

Proposals are due Nov. 30, 2016.

 

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

 

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.

 

 

 

Call for Submissions -- NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

 

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

 

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

 

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

 

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

 

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.

 

 

 

NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble

 

Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has sent back mind-blowing images that not only changed our understanding of our universe, but also changed where we see glimpses of our universe in everyday life.

 

Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Take a moment to think about where you’ve seen the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life. Maybe you own a textbook with a picture of the telescope on the cover, or you walk by a mural inspired by Hubble images every day on your way to work. Perhaps you’ve even created art based on Hubble images. NASA wants to see the Hubble impact in your life! Share your photos with NASA on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook.

 

Images may be submitted on the following social media platforms:

 

-- Flickr: Submit your photos to the Spot Hubble Flickr Group.

-- Instagram: Use the Instagram app to upload your photo, and in the description include #SpotHubble and #NASAGoddard.

-- Twitter: Share your image on Twitter and include #SpotHubble in the tweet.

-- Facebook: Share your image on Facebook and include #SpotHubble in the post.

 

Your #SpotHubble image may be shared on NASA Hubble social media accounts!

 

To learn more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2016/spothubble.

 

 

 

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

 

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science -- in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance -- has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

 

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

 

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

 

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/

 

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.

 

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